Softwood Lumber Agreement 1996

On July 21, 2006, the Tribunal decided that the USTR did not have the authority to issue the injunction to the DOC and that, therefore, the May 2002 anti-dumping and countervailing rulings would not be supported by a positive finding of injury or the threat thereof.106 While federal law requires that cash deposits on resin entries whose liquidation had been suspended before November, in 2004, in this case the majority of conifer duties, have been returned to importers.107 The liquidation of most softwood entries – i.e. the final calculation of customs duties – had been suspended since the publication of the definitive risk of infringement of the ITC in May 2002; the suspension was made pursuant to Section 516A(g)(5)(C) of the Tariff Act of 1930, 19 U.S. C continued. ยง 1516a (g) (5) (C), a provision, 108 On October 13, 2006, the Tribunal decided that the liquidation of all entries subject to the suspension of liquidation pursuant to that provision must be carried out in accordance with the final decision of a NAFTA panel.109 t and therefore without the imposition of anti-dumping and countervailing duties. Accordingly, these deposits should also be reimbursed. The Coniferous Timber Dispute between Canada and the United States is one of the largest and most enduring trade disputes between the two nations. [1] This conflict was born in 1982 and its effects are still visible today. British Columbia, Canada`s largest exporter of conifers to the United States, was the hardest hit, reporting losses of 9,494 direct and indirect jobs between 2004 and 2009. [2] On April 27, 2006, the United States and Canada announced a seven-year framework agreement to resolve their long-standing dispute over U.S. imports of Canadian conifers. The U.S.-Canada Coniferous Timber Agreement (2006 ALS), which came into force on October 12, 2006 with amendments, establishes Canadian export royalties, generally based on average timber prices, with the exception of timber harvested in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the Atlantic provinces. As provided for in the 2006 SLA, the United States has revoked its anti-dumping duties (AD) and countervailing duties (CVD) on coniferous timber and 80% of the estimated customs duties collected are returned to importers collected.

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